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USC Mellon Mentoring Awards

USC Mellon Mentoring Awards

The USC Mellon Mentoring Awards honor individual faculty for helping build a supportive academic environment at USC through faculty-to-student and faculty-to-faculty mentoring.  In addition, the USC-Mellon Culture of Mentoring Award recognizes a mentoring program or faculty development strategy in an academic unit that provides a vital resource for faculty growth and success. The possible award categories are:

  • Award for Undergraduate Mentoring By Faculty
  • Award for Postdoctoral Trainee Mentoring by Faculty
  • Award for Graduate Mentoring By Faculty
  • Award for Faculty-to-Faculty Mentoring
  • Culture of Mentoring Award

The following faculty members are the 2012 awardees in the category of Award for Postdoctoral Trainee Mentoring by Faculty.

Peter C. Mancall

USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

I have been in the very fortunate position of having been able to work closely with a number of post-docs here at USC. Having benefited from wonderful mentors after I received my PhD in 1986, I am deeply committed to sharing whatever I can with these young humanists.   Though I hope our discussions about their manuscripts help them, the real secret is that they teach me as much if not more than I can ever teach them.  They are the future of the academy, destined to play leading roles in research universities.

G.K. Surya Prakash

USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

I strongly believe that mentoring, as a teacher, is a distinct privilege and a responsibility that should not be taken lightly. Mentoring in research involves training students to develop certain attributes for success such as self-confidence, self-respect, self-analysis, critical and deep thinking, good work ethic, timeliness, discipline and drive, self-motivation, good behavior with coworkers, good sense of humor, trust and truthfulness as well as good communication and writing skills. The best way to motivate is by setting good examples and building on success. I strongly believe in the dictum, “Success Succeeds Success”.

Patt Levitt

Keck School of Medicine of USC

USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

A mentor is being part counselor, guide, tutor, teacher, cheerleader and guru. Mentoring is neither solid (inflexible) nor gas (invisible) – it is all about being liquid – being plastic in neuroscience vernacular. It’s about accepting the differences that define each individual who is counting on you, about recognizing that each person brings previous experiences to the table, and about realizing that their goals and aspirations are not yours – their goals are their goals.